Cyber Insurance in Indonesia (Updated)

Dear Insurance providers in Indonesia,

CYBER INSURANCE will be a HUGE MARKET


Try finding a policy here is a long, hard process.

Here are the basics of any Cyber policy

Typical Cyber coverage includes:

A. Third Party Liability

1. Privacy and Data Breach Cover

2. Network Security Claims Cover

3. Media Liability Claims Cover

4. Regulatory Costs and Fines Cover


B. First Party Business Interruption and Crime

5. Hacker Theft Cover

6. Business Interruption and Restoration Costs Cover

7. Cyber Extortion Cover

C. Services

8. Crisis Communication Cover

9. Consultant Services Cover

Deductible/ Retention: USD or IDR XXX each and every claim

Business Interruption waiting period :XXX hours per event

Extensions: – E-Payment/Contractual Penalties – Sub-limit USDor IDR XXX

– Regulatory Costs and Fines Cover – Sub-limit USD or IDR XX

– Business Interruption Loss and Restoration Costs Cover – Sub-limit

USD XXX

– Hacking Theft Cover – Sub-limit USD XXX

– Cyber Extortion – Sub-limit USD XXX

– Crisis Communication Cover – Sub-limit USDxxx

– Consultant Services Cover – Sub-limit USD xxx

Now why is it so hard to find cover in Indonesia?

First, insurers do not have a large data sample to pool funds and collect information.

Secondly, it is hard to measure actual loss versus fraud loss

Thirdly,  the market is not mature.

How do we assist insurers with these issues:

1. Let us form a consortium of companies requiring Cyber Coverage

2. Work with OJK (the Financial Services Authority in Indonesia OJK Insurance information

3. Collaborate with the Association Indonesian Internet Service Providers   APJII http://www.apjii.or.id/

4. Work with legal resources to form the basic forms and methods of cover  PERADI www.peradi.or.id/

5. Collaborate with E-Commerce companies, ATM Switching companies, Banks and other financial institutions

6.  Educate insurers on the need for providing cover and the potential market size (coaching, mentoring)  www.lincknowledgeacademy.com

Together, we can find a solution.

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Chipmaker Nvidia accelerates move into smarter automobiles

Chipmaker Nvidia accelerates move into smarter automobiles

Mon Jan 5, 2015 12:33am EST

(Reuters) – Chipmaker Nvidia on Sunday unveiled a new processor aimed at powering high-end graphics on car dashboards as well as sophisticated auto-pilot systems.

At an event in Las Vegas ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show, Nvidia Chief Executive Jen-Hsun Huang said the Tegra X1 chip would provide enough computing horsepower for automobiles with displays built into mirrors, dashboard, navigation systems and passenger seating.

“The future car is going to have an enormous amount of computational ability,” Huang said. “We imagine the number of displays in your car will grow very rapidly.”

The Tegra X1 has twice the performance of its predecessor, the Tegra K1, and will come out in early 2015, Nvidia said.

An upcoming platform combining two of the X1 chips can process data collected from up to 12 high-definition cameras monitoring traffic, blind spots and other safety conditions in driver assistance systems, Huang said.

Combined with next-generation software, the chips can help detect and read road signs, recognize pedestrians and detect braking vehicles, he said.

Santa Clara, California-based Nvidia in recent years has been expanding beyond its core business of designing high-end graphics chips for personal computers.

After struggling to compete against larger chipmakers like Qualcomm in smartphones and tablets, Nvidia is now increasing its focus on using its Tegra mobile chips in cars and is already supplying companies including Audi, BMW and Tesla.

In the third quarter, revenue from Tegra chips for automobiles and mobile devices jumped 51 percent to $168 million but it remained small compared to Nvidia’s total revenue of $1.225 billion.

(Reporting by Noel Randewich)

Happy 35th birthday, Walkman

Happy 35th birthday, Walkman

 
Doug Gross, CNN
 
Released in 1979, the TPS-L2 was the first model of Walkman that Sony released. It wasn't the very first portable cassette player designed to let users listen on the go. But the earlier product, called the Stereobelt, was considered too big, ugly and expensive and didn't last long.Released in 1979, the TPS-L2 was the first model of Walkman that Sony released. It wasn’t the very first portable cassette player designed to let users listen on the go. But the earlier product, called the Stereobelt, was considered too big, ugly and expensive and didn’t last long.
 
 
35 years of the Walkman
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The Sony Walkman turns 35 on Tuesday
  • The cassette player was retired in 2010, but Walkman mp3 players remain
 

(CNN) — It was 35 years ago Tuesday that Sony, not Apple, revolutionized the way we listen to music.

The Walkman, a portable cassette player that, for the first time, let us take our music with us without bothering our neighbors, hit the market on July 1, 1979.

 

See kids baffled by a Walkman

Today, it’s all about Apple’s iPod. But in its heyday, the Walkman was as synonymous with portable music players as Kleenex became to tissue and Xerox was to copy machines.

Bowing to digital reality, Sony retired the cassette Walkman in 2010.

Check out our gallery for a look at some of the most iconic Walkman models through the years. What are some of your Walkman memories? Let us know in the comments.

 

Big broadcasters vanquish upstart Aereo at U.S. Supreme Court

Big broadcasters vanquish upstart Aereo at U.S. Supreme Court

BY LAWRENCE HURLEY AND JONATHAN STEMPEL (updated by Endah)

WASHINGTON Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:19pm EDT

 
Aereo CEO and founder Chet Kanojia (C) departs the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington April 22, 2014. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Aereo CEO and founder Chet Kanojia (C) departs the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington April 22, 2014.

CREDIT: REUTERS/JONATHAN ERNST

 
 
 (Reuters) – Broadcast and cable TV are not dead yet.

In a decision that could crimp consumers’ hopes to cut the cord from their cable operators, the U.S Supreme Court said Aereo Inc, a video streaming service backed by media mogul Barry Diller, violated copyright law by using tiny antennas to broadcast TV content online to paying subscribers.

Wednesday’s 6-3 decision, written by Justice Stephen Breyer, is a victory for traditional broadcasters such as CBS Corp, Comcast Corp’s NBC, Walt Disney Co’s ABC, and Twenty-First Century Fox Inc’s Fox.

It may also make it harder for Internet rivals to provide alternative, a la carte programming at cut-rate prices, and casts Aereo’s own future into doubt.

“As convenient and as fun as it is for the consumer, an adverse decision would have completely changed the business model of Hollywood and of movies and TV,” said Roger Entner, a telecommunications analyst at Recon Analytics LLC in Boston.

The decision may also raise concern for other technologies, such as cloud computing, that innovation would be stifled by making it too easy to deem use of certain content as theft. The Supreme Court majority played down that issue, saying it would wait for a case that specifically addressed such technologies.

 

AS SEEN WITH CABLE TV

Started in 2012 and backed by Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp, Aereo typically costs about $8 to $12 a month, and lets users stream live broadcasts on mobile devices. Aereo does not pay the broadcasters. The service has operated in 11 U.S. cities, and does not provide subscriber data.

Writing for the majority, Breyer said Aereo is “not simply an equipment provider,” but rather bears an “overwhelming likeness” to cable TV companies whose ability to retransmit broadcasts was limited under a 1976 copyright law.

Any differences, he said, “concern not the nature of the service that Aereo provides so much as the technological manner in which it provides the service,” which he said constituted a public performance of copyrighted content.

Breyer agreed with the federal government that it was premature to suggest the decision could doom cloud-based services where TV shows, music and other content are stored on the Internet via servers from Google Inc, Microsoft Corp, DropBox Inc and Box Inc, among others.

Joining the majority were Chief Justice John Roberts, and Justices Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

Justice Antonin Scalia, joined by fellow conservative Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito, dissented, likening Aereo to a “copy shop that provides its patrons with a library card” and lets them decide what to view.

Scalia said he shared the majority’s “evident feeling” that Aereo’s activities “ought not to be allowed.”

But he said the majority distorted copyright law, and should have let Congress fashion a solution better than “the crude ‘looks-like-cable-TV’ solution the Court invents.”

For the networks, the victory protects the estimated $3 billion in so-called retransmission fees that broadcasters get from cable and satellite TV systems. Some broadcasters had threatened to cut off their free signals or create their own low-cost Internet feeds had Aereo won.

The decision also helps professional sports leagues such as Major League Baseball and the National Football League, which have lucrative licensing contracts with broadcasters and said an Aereo victory could force them to move all games to cable TV.

 

AEREO LAMENTS “MASSIVE SETBACK”

Chet Kanojia, Aereo’s chief executive, called the decision “a massive setback” for American consumers, but stopped short of saying it means the end of the service.

“Free-to-air broadcast television should not be available only to those who can afford to pay for the cable or satellite bundle,” he said in a statement. “We are disappointed in the outcome, but our work is not done.”

Diller, 72, has tried to redefine TV and how people watch it since launching the Fox network in 1986. Four years later, he even scheduled “The Simpsons” cartoon to run against “The Cosby Show,” long a ratings powerhouse at NBC.

IAC, which he now chairs, holds assets such as the comedy site CollegeHumor and the video sharing site Vimeo.

In an emailed statement, Diller said about the Aereo decision: “It’s not a big (financial) loss for us, but I do believe blocking this technology is a big loss for consumers.” Diller is worth about $2.5 billion, Forbes magazine said.

Broadcasters’ share prices rose after the decision was announced, and CBS shares closed ___ percent higher.

“This is a terrific victory for anybody who’s involved in the content business,” and encourages the production of more programming, CBS Chief Executive Leslie Moonves said on CNBC. “This is a very pro-consumer thing, and frankly for Aereo to say that it isn’t, you know, is a little bit of sour grapes.”

The decision overturned an April 2013 ruling by the federal appeals court in New York, which had denied the broadcasters’ request to shut down Aereo while litigation moves forward.

The case is American Broadcasting Cos et al, v Aereo Inc, U.S. Supreme Court, No. 13-461.

 

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley in Washington and Jonathan Stempel in New York; Additional reporting by Liana Baker, Jeffrey Dastin, Marina Lopes, Christian Plumb,Jennifer Saba and Alina Selyukh; Editing by Howard GollerWill Dunham and Grant McCool)

 

 

 

 

IRS says Lerner emails lost forever, but agency had contract with file-storage company Sonasoft

IRS says Lerner emails lost forever, but agency had contract with file-storage company Sonasoft

 

The Obama administration claims that emails connected to Lois Lerner, the IRS official at the center of the Tea Party-targeting scandal, are lost forever because her computer hard drive crashed, but skeptics are pointing out the agency had a contract with a file-storage company.

House congressional investigators have requested emails from 2009 to 2011, when the IRS division led by Lerner began targeting for extra scrutiny Tea Party and other conservative nonprofits applying for tax-exempt status. 

The IRS had a contract with email-achiever Sonasoft in effect at least through 2009, according to the website FedSpending.org.

That same year, the company tweeted: “The IRS uses Sonasoft to back up their servers, why wouldn’t you choose them to protect your servers?”

And a document on the company website suggests its system “archives all email content and so reduces the risk of non-compliance with legal, regulatory and other obligations to preserve critical business content.” 

However, whether Sonasoft’s government contract extended through 2011 or if the company had the capacity to save every email from such a large agency remains unclear.

The California-based company could not be reached Sunday for comment.

The agency has said that internal backup tapes are recycled every six months and that Lerner’s hard drive has now been recycled.

In addition to the IRS saying the emails are un-recoverable, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney gave a similar statement Wednesday. He also said none of Lerner’s recoverable emails included direct exchanges with the Executive Office of the President and that the agency is turning over 24,000 Lerner emails, recovered through the files of other email users.

The IRS told Congress earlier this month that it could not produce all of the requested Lerner emails because her hard drive crashed in 2011.

And last week, Michigan GOP Rep. Dave Camp, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, said the IRS also has lost emails from six other IRS personnel.

 

IRS says Lerner emails lost forever, but agency had contract with file-storage company Sonasoft

IRS says Lerner emails lost forever, but agency had contract with file-storage company Sonasoft

 

The Obama administration claims that emails connected to Lois Lerner, the IRS official at the center of the Tea Party-targeting scandal, are lost forever because her computer hard drive crashed, but skeptics are pointing out the agency had a contract with a file-storage company.

House congressional investigators have requested emails from 2009 to 2011, when the IRS division led by Lerner began targeting for extra scrutiny Tea Party and other conservative nonprofits applying for tax-exempt status. 

The IRS had a contract with email-achiever Sonasoft in effect at least through 2009, according to the website FedSpending.org.

That same year, the company tweeted: “The IRS uses Sonasoft to back up their servers, why wouldn’t you choose them to protect your servers?”

And a document on the company website suggests its system “archives all email content and so reduces the risk of non-compliance with legal, regulatory and other obligations to preserve critical business content.” 

However, whether Sonasoft’s government contract extended through 2011 or if the company had the capacity to save every email from such a large agency remains unclear.

The California-based company could not be reached Sunday for comment.

The agency has said that internal backup tapes are recycled every six months and that Lerner’s hard drive has now been recycled.

In addition to the IRS saying the emails are un-recoverable, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney gave a similar statement Wednesday. He also said none of Lerner’s recoverable emails included direct exchanges with the Executive Office of the President and that the agency is turning over 24,000 Lerner emails, recovered through the files of other email users.

The IRS told Congress earlier this month that it could not produce all of the requested Lerner emails because her hard drive crashed in 2011.

And last week, Michigan GOP Rep. Dave Camp, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, said the IRS also has lost emails from six other IRS personnel.

 

Political and media consultant at center of explosives manhunt is in custody.

Political and media consultant at center of explosives manhunt is in custody.

Political and media consultant at center of explosives manhunt is in custody.