Stakeholder meeting issues, people veer off track? Here is the hack to get control back!

Stakeholder meeting issues, people veer off track? Here is the hack to get control back!

If you are using PMBOK6 , AGILE, adaptive, or  Waterfall methodologies, setting norms for stakeholder communications which includes meeting management is a critical tool for increasing the chances for project success while reducing the probability of conflict in projects.

By setting norms that are strong yet easy to follow and understand all parties can move up the Tuckman ladder easier and with greater speed and agility.

The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY Jakarta, uses the Why Am I Talking (WAIT) meeting management techniques in all of our internal and project management meetings.

PMBOK6 Communication, stakeholders, meeting management

The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY manages projects and trains Project Managers in Indonesia using AGILE, PMBOK, and hybrid methodologies.

Contact the PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY, Jakarta for all of your Project Management and Project Manager training needs in Indonesia. www.project-general.com pmo@project-general.com

https://project-general.com/stakeholder-meeting-issues-people-veer-off-track-here-is-the-hack-to-get-control-back/

Advertisements

Lean Coffee – Meeting techniques used at the PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY, JAKARTA

Lean Coffee Lives Here at The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY

WHAT IS LEAN COFFEE(tm)?

Lean Coffee is a structured, but agenda-less meeting. Participants gather, build an agenda, and begin talking. Conversations are directed and productive because the agenda for the meeting was democratically generated. There are currently dozens of Lean Coffees happening world-wide, including Seattle, San Francisco, Stockholm, Toronto, Boulder, New York City, Jakarta, and more.

WHERE DID LEAN COFFEE START?

Lean Coffee started in Seattle in 2009. Jim Benson and Jeremy Lightsmith wanted to start a group that would discuss Lean techniques in knowledge work – but didn’t want to start a whole new cumbersome organization with steering committees, speakers, and such. They wanted a group that did not rely on anything other than people showing up and wanting to learn or create.

Now, Seattle Lean Coffee happens every week, is very popular, and requires only that someone who has been there before shows up – and even then it’s just so they know where we stash the post-it notes.

HOW DOES LEAN COFFEE WORK?

The format for a Lean Coffee is very simple. This is intentional. It is meant to be the least structure necessary for a coherent and productive meeting. No more, no less.

1. Set up a Personal Kanban

In this Personal Kanban we have the items to discuss, what we are currently discussing, and the discussed columns. This provides a structure for the conversation. Next we populate it:

2. What to Discuss

People all get pads of post-it notes and a pen. They then start to add their topics for conversation into the “to discuss” column. These can be literally whatever people want to discuss or follow a theme. Right now, we want to encourage as many unique ideas as we can.

When the ideas start reach a certain point (an you’ll be the best judge of when that is), each topic gets a 1 to 2 sentence introduction. This way people know what to vote for.

3. Vote and Talk

 Each participant gets two votes. You can vote twice for the same thing or for two different topics. Simple put a dot on the sticky you are interested in. Tally the dots. Then you are ready to have a conversation. The power here is that you now have a list of topics everyone at the table is interested in and is motivated to discuss for real.

Lean coffee in stockholm

WHAT IF I WANT TO START A LEAN COFFEE?

Do it! It really is this simple.

ABOUT THE PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY

Contact the PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY, Jakarta.

pmo@project-general.com

www.project-general.com

About the Project General Company

The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY manage projects using PMBOK, AGILE, ISO and Hybrid methodologies as an outsource and in-source provider of services and training. Portfolio, Program and Project. PMO Consultation. The Project General Company also trains project managers using PMBOK (PMP), AGILE, and ISO 21500 project management methodologies.

The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY manages projects in Indonesia using PMBOK and AGILE. The PROJECT GENERAL COMPANY trains project managers for AGILE and PMP (PMBOK) Certification in Indonesia.

The Project General Company Trains PROJECT MANAGERS (PMBOK) for PMP Certification in Indonesia Project Management Certification Training (PMP) Next class = Jan 21- 25, 2019

The Project General Company Trains PROJECT MANAGERS (PMBOK) for PMP Certification in Indonesia 

Project Management Certification Training (PMP) 

Next class = Jan 21- 25, 2019 

More info:

https://projectgeneralcompany.blogspot.com/2019/01/the-project-general-company-trains.html

ProjectFlo® 6 
Based on PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) - Sixth Edition, released in late 2017, you will learn:   ​
5 Process Groups through Imagery
10 Knowledge Areas through 10 carefully chosen colors 
49 Processes illustrated on a Visual Process Map

Learn the PMI-way faster than a speeding tiger!
We’ve summarized their 750+ page book on one page and made it a game.  
Grab Your Tablet, Tiger!


ProjectFlo® 6 
Based on PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Sixth Edition, released in late 2017, you will learn:   ​
5 Process Groups through Imagery
10 Knowledge Areas through 10 carefully chosen colors 
49 Processes illustrated on a Visual Process Map

Four Attributes of a successful project management consultant – The Project General Company Jakarta

The Project General Company Jakarta Manages Project in Indonesia, Trains Projects Managers (PMP, PMBOK, AGILE) in Indonesia. www.project-general.com  pmo@project-general.com

The project General Company Jakarta believes that there are four attributes of a project management consultant:

(1) a solid foundation in project management or a subject matter expert (SME) in a particular area of project management, such as a PMP® or AGILE, or ISO 21500;

(2) demonstrated experience applying project management “best practices” in practical situations;

(3) genuine customer relationship management (i.e., understanding the client’s problems, formulating recommendations, and implementing solutions); and

(4) credibility 

As a project management consulting company, our services are based on providing our clients with resources with the appropriate knowledge and skills. We hire staff with educational and/or certification requirements. We look for candidates with a college degree in the functional area in which they will be working (e.g., information technology, health care, finance). Since we operate in government regulated markets, the PMP® is a minimum requirement for our project managers. Other certifications and credentials provide our clients with specialized knowledge, such as the Certified Cost Estimator/Analyst (CCEA®) from the Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis or the Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) from the ScrumAlliance®. A solid foundation in project management or a subject matter expert (SME) in a particular area of project management, such as a PMP® or AGILE, or ISO 21500.

Client Relationship Management

The biggest challenge for many project management consultants is not applying project management knowledge and demonstrated experience in client engagements, but having to manage a client’s expectations. This involves another set of skills that are often difficult to master:

Strong communication skills. Consultants need to establish open and frequent interactions with the client and have the ability to speak and articulate thoughts clearly and concisely. This includes being able to present well, to write clearly and effectively, and to listen actively

Proven problem-solving skills. When a problem is identified, consultants need to able to define the problem, identify and assess root causes, and develop recommendations that will address the problem and satisfy the client.

Managing client relationships also involves a different set of expectations and challenges. To be successful, the consultant will have to understand the client(s) and their roles in their organizations. Project General identified several challenges when working within a client’s organization:

Adjusting to the methodology. The client’s organization may have established project management processes and practices and the consultant will have to “align” with the skills and knowledge the client is providing. The client’s methodology needs to be followed and any “best practices” implemented needs to be in terms of the client’s processes and practices.

Understanding the organizational structure. The client has constraints and opportunities offered by the client’s own organization. Obtaining an understanding of the organization and the client’s business processes, organizational resources, and reporting requirements is an important part of the consultant being able to help their clients.

Understanding the organizational politics. It is important to know the world in which the client must operate so that the consultant understands how to successfully help their client.

Being the outsider. This could be a good thing, but it could be problematic. The consultant is often in the role of a “sword or shield” for the client—delivering unfavorable messages or defending the client’s position. If the consultant focuses on doing what’s best for the client, their work will provide better results for their organization.

As a project management consulting company, our success and continued business is based on sound client relationships. All new employees are required to participate in an introduction to consulting training. This helps sets expectations and provides new employees with resources for developing client relationship management skills. We use mentoring and coaching to help refine communication and problem-solving skills of all staff, but with particular attention to staff responsible for client interactions. We also use personal performance assessments, with input from clients, peers, subordinates, and managers, to identify strengths and weaknesses in client relationship management. Weaknesses are addressed through professional development plans.

We also understand that client relationships are about personalities. We involve senior management in helping establish and maintain client relationships. This helps with the early identification and resolution of personality conflicts between consultants and clients.

Credibility

Credibility comes through relationships with clients who have become confident in the consultant’s abilities to meet their expectations. Clients appreciate qualities that all of us should be capable of providing: honesty, dependability, integrity, and hard work. By establishing trust based on sound relationships, proven project management capabilities, and the ability to meet their expectations, clients will share the consultant’s accomplishments with others, which establishes credibility.

Credibility also comes from delivering value. Value could be measured by successfully delivering that project on schedule, within budget, and to performance requirements. However, when a consultant can help a client address their “pain points” while delivering that project, the consultant is now focusing on the client’s true needs. Consultants must develop the ability to identify and understand their clients’ problems, empathize with their pain, and find solutions. When a client asks, “What do you think we should do?” the consultant has established credibility in being able to help with what’s best for the client.

Successful consultants are:

As a project management consulting company, we know what it takes to be a successful consultant. In addition to what we have presented on this web page, here are several attributes we have observed in our more successful project management consultants:

Credibility also comes from delivering value. Value could be measured by successfully delivering that project on schedule, within budget, and to performance requirements. However, when a consultant can help a client address their “pain points” while delivering that project, the consultant is now focusing on the client’s true needs. Consultants must develop the ability to identify and understand their clients’ problems, empathize with their pain, and find solutions. When a client asks, “What do you think we should do?” the consultant has established credibility in being able to help with what’s best for the client.

Confident—the consultant being able to successfully use the four attributes to deliver value to the client, continually, and be willing to assess and improve his or her skills and performance.

Proactive—continually assessing the client’s business objectives for potential impacts. By establishing sound client relations, the consultant can identify potential client “pain points” and prepare for possible solutions.

Innovative—taking proven practices and, with slight modifications, address their client’s “pain points.” Providing value by using common tools and techniques, effectively and efficiently, to meet unique client needs.

The Project General Company specializes in Project Management in Indonesia.